Featured Issues

What Is Postevangelicalism?

Most church historians trace the birth of modern evangelicalism to the late 1940s into the early 1950s. Christian leaders such as Billy Graham, Carl Henry and Harold John Okenga, lamenting the separatism and anti-intellectualism of Fundamentalist leaders, organized an institutional separation from Fundamentalism.

[continue reading...]

About IIP

James P. Eckman (Jim) is President Emeritus and Professor in Bible and History at Grace University in Omaha, Nebraska. He has been at Grace since 1983. He holds the following degrees:

  • B.S., Millersville University of Pennsylvania (1969)
  • M.A., Lehigh University (1973)
  • Th.M. (with honor), Dallas Theological Seminary (1983)
  • Ph.D., University of Nebraska–Lincoln (1989)

He has also completed additional postgraduate work at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He received the Charles A. Nash Award in Historical Theology while at Dallas Seminary. [Read More]

Featured Issues

What Does Living The Gospel Look Like?

One of the major themes of Issues in Perspective is that God’s Word gives humanity the insight, discernment, and resources to accurately analyze the human condition. A major conviction of cultural Christianity, which dominates much of evangelical Christianity today, is that politics is the answer to the human condition.

Trump’s Betrayal Causes A Perilous Re-alignment In The Middle East

The United States had been negotiating with Turkey for months to establish a safe zone in the Middle East that would protect both Kurdish and Turkish interests, all the while maintaining the remarkable gains made against the Islamic State (ISIS). But, to the astonishment of everyone, after a phone call with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, President Trump ordered US troops to retreat from northern Syria.

Bible Study Podcast

Colossians 2:20-3:2

Legalism and asceticism are of no value in earning God’s favor; only faith in Jesus Christ alone results in salvation.

Culture & Wordview

What Is Postevangelicalism?

Most church historians trace the birth of modern evangelicalism to the late 1940s into the early 1950s. Christian leaders such as Billy Graham, Carl Henry and Harold John Okenga, lamenting the separatism and anti-intellectualism of Fundamentalist leaders, organized an institutional separation from Fundamentalism.

Ethics

Ethics: The Unthinkable Becoming Acceptable

Years ago, I read an article written by the late Chuck Colson, who made this observation about ethical issues in Western Civilization: “What was once unthinkable, become debatable and then gradually becomes acceptable.” I do not know whether this was original with Colson or whether he borrowed it from someone else, but many times I have affirmed the accuracy of this reflection. I guess I have become hardened as I have gotten older, but I find myself rarely stunned by cultural accommodation anymore. Developments I once regarded as unthinkable are now accepted widely and enthusiastically.